Interview with Josh Mackay – 2018 International Airbrush Competition

This next interview is with Josh Mackay, who placed 2nd in the Fine Art (Fantasy) category of our 2018 competition with his entry: Yoda, done with UV paint! Josh started airbrushing not so long ago and does it as a creative outlet outside of his job. Read about how he continues to set higher goals and targets for himself to learn and also his tips for beginners to get started! Also check out his other works in the links at the end of the interview!

Sparmax (S): Can you tell us a little bit about yourself, what is your background? When did you start airbrushing and what was the learning process like for you?

Josh Mackay (JM): I started airbrushing around 4 years ago through a local airbrush course in Melbourne-Australia, I was personally taught by Laurent Machado who is an incredible airbrush artist. The process was structured and intensive, frustrating at times (which you need to push through to see results) but I can say for sure that I would be nowhere near the level I am without the training.

 

S: Can you tell us a bit more about your winning entry piece? How / why did you choose it? How long did it take, and what inspired you?

JM: I purchased some Wicked UV glow paint and decided something with a lightsaber in it would be appropriate. I decided on Yoda as I had the reference image on my phone as a future piece to paint, so it was the perfect time with the UV glow.  It took less than 10 hours over a week or so (finding time between work and other commitments) which included setting up/packing up and my usual procrastination.

 

S: What does airbrushing mean to you and what drives your passion for airbrushing and creating art? Also, how do you find the ideas for your other works?

JM: Airbrushing is my creative outlet, I’m an Engineer by day in a corporate environment. If I were to airbrush for my day job, I would want to be doing automotive work, I don’t really have experience in that area yet, but I think that would be my driving force.  The ideas just come from finding cool pictures that I think I would enjoy painting, I never put that much thought into it, I just make sure I enjoy it.

 

S: What are your goals / targets for airbrushing? What do you want to achieve?

JM: To learn more about airbrushing in colour which is a weakness, I haven’t spent much time on it. To push my detail and realism further.  Then finally work on the speed that I can produce an artwork without procrastinating which is another issue I have.

 

S: Do you specialize or prefer to work on a specific surface?

JM: Hard surfaces are the best. But I mostly paint on paper and canvas as most customers prefer them.

 

S: How would you describe your style(s) in airbrushing?

JM: My paintings need to look like my reference, it bugs me when they are too different.

 

S: Any advice to beginners looking to start airbrushing?

JM: When you’re frustrated, walk away, take a break then come back, frustration means you’re about to learn something. Go and learn about the relationship between paint reduction/paint thickness and your psi settings, I notice a lot of beginners have issues here.

 

S: Do you have a website or blog? How can people reach you on social media?

JM: Instagram: @artworkbyjosh and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/artworkbyjosh

 

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Interview with Dale Daniel – 2018 International Airbrush Competition

Our next interview is with Dale Daniel, who placed 2nd in our Hobby / Model category with his entry: Hand. Although highly skilled in all manners, he prefers working freehand. Read about his winning piece and his 20 years of airbrush experience. You should also check out his website and social media, links at the end of the interview!

hand3

Sparmax (S): Can you tell us a little bit about yourself, what is your background? When did youstart airbrushing and what was the learning process was like for you?
Dale Daniel (DD): I have been airbrushing and custom painting for over 20 years. Past projects include walls, RV’s, Motorcycles, and Automobiles as well as odd items like prosthetic hands, a 5 foot tall dough mixer, and many, many more. I am mostly self-taught over hundreds of projects. I continue to learn something on every project. Currently I stay very busy with a 3-4 month backlog of projects waiting to be started.

S: Can you tell us a bit more about your winning entry piece? How / why did you
choose it? How long did it take, and what inspired you?
DD: The winning piece was one of my most challenging projects. It is a prosthetic hand a
customer brought to me. He wanted it to look as realistic as possible to be like the
“Terminator” hand. I studied images and references for hours, and then determined a
freehand approach would be best on the surface. I lightly airbrushed the shapes, and then used my Iwata custom micron to paint in as much detail as possible all freehand. I believe I had about 30 to 35 hours in the project.

S: What does airbrushing mean to you and what drives your passion for airbrushing
and creating art? Also, how do you find the ideas for your other works?
DD: Airbrushing has always fascinated me since I first learned to use one in school. I always thought it looked like magic to see the paint appear on the surface as if it is almost invisible as it leaves the airbrush. I fell in love with the softness of the medium, as well as the speed you can paint. Also, I love the ability to do very tiny freehand detailed work, and then use the same airbrush to paint in a large gradient. I strive for very clean detailed artwork. Ideas mainly come from my customer’s requests. I then take that request and come up with renderings and sketches to start a project.

S: What are your goals / targets for airbrushing? What do you want to achieve?
DD: My goals for airbrushing are to continue to improve my quality as well as efficiency and continue to operate a successful business. I want to achieve the approval of each client I paint a project for with good customer service and quality. I strive to provide a final project they can be proud of, because that is the essence of custom painting. It’s all about helping the customer’s idea come to reality on a project that is dear to them. Whether for their own enjoyment or as a gift to honor someone in their lives as in the many helmets I paint for retiring military pilots.

S: Do you specialize or prefer to work on a specific surface?
DD: I prefer freehand airbrush work instead of complicated masking techniques. My preferred surface to paint on is sanded automotive clear coat because it is very smooth and forgiving. I do at times use complicated masking and multiple steps depending on the desired result.

S: How would you describe your style(s) in airbrushing?
DD: My style is very detailed, clean, and accurate.

S: Any advice to beginners looking to start airbrushing?
DD: Beginners should practice all the time just as if you are doodling in class with a pencil. Get to where you can draw with an airbrush as good as with a pencil. If you can draw well, you can airbrush if you learn how to control it. Practice drills to help learn how to control the flow of paint and line thickness.

S: Do you have a website or blog? How can people reach you on social media?
DD: My website is http://www.daledanielart.com
I can be found on Facebook under Dale Daniel Art & Design and Instagram is dale_daniel_art

Interview with Neimar Duarte – 2018 International Airbrush Competition

This next interview is with Neimar Duarte from Brazil, who placed 2nd in the competition for the Automotive Art category with his piece: Traveller Skull. Read about how he uses airbrush as the medium to express the creativity in his mind and how he utilises this talent for his own art and commissioned pieces! Links at the end of the interview to see more of his amazing work!

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Sparmax (S): Can you tell us a little bit about yourself, what is your background? When did you start airbrushing and what was the learning process was like for you?

Neimar Duarte (ND): I love to draw since I was a child, this passion kept growing, so in my teens I started to dedicate myself more to study drawing through books and magazines, it was before I had internet at home… Due to my passion for custom cars and motorcycles, I discovered airbrush art, and later in 2005 I was able to buy my first airbrush, and make my own compressor at home.
Actually I wasn’t able to go to any art school, however my desire to learn was so strong that I decided to teach myself, through magazines and books, later by videos on the internet, artists who post step by step process on social media, and lots of thinking and practice.

 

S: Can you tell us a bit more about your winning entry piece? How / why did you choose it? How long did it take, and what inspired you?

ND: This skull is part of the custom painting I did on a Harley Davidson. As it was a commission work, the idea was born out of a good discussion with the owner who told me a little bit about him and his tastes. He gave me freedom to create but I had in mind everything he told me. Things like the main element of the motorcycle culture, freedom, travel, wildness… So I came out with this monochromatic composition of skull, roads, compass, clock, birds… I tried to make it elegant. I always make a digital illustration before, once it’s approved by the customer, I started the painting process. Most of the time I do the entire process, from the metal to the clear coat. That was the case in this project.
The particular skull in the front fender took me one week to finish; the entire motorcycle took me two months.

 

S: What does airbrushing mean to you and what drives your passion for airbrushing and creating art? Also, how do you find the ideas for your other works?

ND: Airbrush for me means freedom, to create and put in to some surface, in a visual form, the crazy ideas that keeps running around my mind, being able to show it to the world, making people imagine things outside of the real world.
When I’m doing something for myself, the ideas came from elements that I collect in my mind daily, I’m constantly being inspired by things I see everywhere I am. When I’m doing some commission, I mix the customer ideas with these things that I have in my mind.

 

S: What are your goals / targets for airbrushing? What do you want to achieve?

ND: My goal is to be able to create more pieces for myself, completely free. And to do more for the art, sharing knowledge, maybe learn how to teach.

 

S: Do you specialize or prefer to work on a specific surface?

ND: I like better to work over metal, but sometimes tridimensional pieces are a little tricky to work on and demands lots of time in preparation. So I feel more comfortable working on an ACM panel, which is a composite aluminum panel that comes painted, it’s a perfect surface to work, you just scuff pad it and it’s ready to go.

 

S: How would you describe your style(s) in airbrushing

ND: I like to mix photorealistic looks with elements or scenes that do not exist or are impossible to happen. Or at least I make things with more contrast, shinier or more colorful. Now depending on the subject, I’m looking photo references with more freedom, feeling that I can change things to make it unique and more interesting.

 

S: Any advice to beginners looking to start airbrushing?

ND: For the very beginners in airbrush, don’t be afraid if your first contact with the airbrush looks like crap. My first attempts were really scary, at first I thought, “it’s not gonna work.” But you have to be persistent and keep going, it will get better soon.

Yes, practice is very important, but you have to stop and just think sometimes, research about what element of the paint you are trying to reach at that moment. Then you go to practice again.
Remember that painting came after drawing, and as you are painting you use drawing techniques, so it’s very important to study drawing as well.

 

S: Do you have a website or blog? How can people reach you on social media?

ND: Yes, I got my website www.neimarduarte.com
Instagram: Neimar Duarte
Facebook: Neimar L. DuArte Fine Art & Custom Paint

Interview with Rico Pahlig – 2018 International Airbrush Competition

Our next interview is with Rico Pahlig, who placed 2nd in our Fine Art (Realism) category with his entry: Rausch. Read about how he mastered his hobby and combined it with his other hobbies and interests. You can also check out more of his works from his website: www.aloha-airbrush.de

Rausch

Sparmax (S): Can you tell us a little bit about yourself, what is your background? When did you start airbrushing and what was the learning process was like for you?

Rico Pahlig (RP): It began in march 2010. My girlfriend, and now my wife, gave me a one-day airbrush course gift. A few months later, in summertime 2010, I bought my first airbrush kit. I started the first steps with not a lot of success. In autumn 2010 I had an entry at the IBKK in Bochum. I began with a weekend study in airbrush design. I received the Diploma – exam in April 2016 and finished with Master-Title in December 2017. Everything is a hobby. I have a fulltime job in a factory as a draftsman and programmer for Laser-cutting.

 

S: Can you tell us a bit more about your winning entry piece? How / why did you choose it? How long did it take, and what inspired you?

RP: The picture “Rausch” is based on a photo from me. It originated last summer during a photo shoot with a friend of mine. I am interested in Fantasy and medieval things and so we produced some photos in this style. To make pictures is another hobby of mine. So I try to combine these things. The next reason is that I don´t hurt copyrights and I never must ask another person if I can use his / her pictures. I like portraits and so it was a challenge for myself, to paint such a big picture. All the years I painted with glazed /varnish colors and now I change to the covering / glazed technique. It was my third painting in this technique. It took around 150 hours. The inspiration was my passion for my interests which I wrote on the top.

 

S: What does airbrushing mean to you and what drives your passion for airbrushing and creating art? Also, how do you find the ideas for your other works?

RP: For me, airbrush is a non digital art in a faster world. When I am painting, I have time to go in the picture, I can relax and sometimes it is meditative.

I can integrate some of my ideas that are not in a photo. My aim is to paint a photorealistic picture. With every painting I want to become better.

When I was a teenager, I saw an artbook from Luis Royo. I was fascinated. I saw the beautiful wives, the badass monsters and the landscape. I love the details in his work and the technique. That was the reason to start with airbrush. But it takes a lot of time to start.

 

S: What are your goals / targets for airbrushing? What do you want to achieve?

RP: I would be happy, if I can earn some money with my art.

 

S: Do you specialize or prefer to work on a specific surface?

RP: I work with Schoellershammer-carton. That is my favorite surface. Sometimes on canvas. Smaller things on metal are ok. Other surfaces I haven’t tried yet.

 

S: How would you describe your style(s) in airbrushing?

RP: Far too exact and too slow.   🙂    I learn all the time and I try some new things with every painting.

 

S: Any advice to beginners looking to start airbrushing?

RP: Don’t give up and start slowly. Start with easy things and simple structures. You´ll grow up with your paintings. Stay steady at work.

 

S: Do you have a website or blog? How can people reach you on social media?

RP: Interested people can follow me on my page. You can find it at:  www.aloha-airbrush.de   Or you can take a look at Instagram:   aloha_airbrush_aloha_pictures.

On both sites are a mix of paintings and photos.

Interview With Ivan Drond – 2018 International Airbrush Competition

Our next interview is with Ivan Drond, First Place winner of the Hobby / Model category. If parts of his interview looks familiar, it’s because he was also ranked in our 2016 competition! We also asked some different questions this time round to learn more about his airbrush techniques and preferences, and see how he continues to win the decision from our judges! Another stunning entry for sure!

Egyptian army tank b

Sparmax (S): Can you tell us a little bit about yourself, what is your background? When did you start airbrushing and what was the learning process was like for you?

Ivan Drond (ID): I am 38 years old. I was born and raised in Moscow. I have been fond of airbrushing since childhood. Accidentally passing by the store for modeling, I saw a tank and I wanted to try to collect it myself. At first it was just a hobby, but gradually I began to engage in modeling professionally. After a while I learn about the technique of airbrushing. Then I bought my first airbrush and compressor and started picking up techniques and techniques from the Internet and DVD lessons.

 

S: Can you tell us a bit more about your winning entry piece? How / why did you choose it? How long did it take, and what inspired you?

ID: I am attracted to colorful equipment with a lot of operational effects involved in conflicts in the East. The work took about six months, as I wanted to do it as efficiently as possible.

 

S: What does airbrushing mean to you and what drives your passion for airbrushing and creating art? Also, how do you find the ideas for your other works?

ID: I take my inspiration from many sources-historical literature, documentary, which shows armored vehicles. Looking at the photos or video, I imagine how I will build my next work. Besides the works of Miguel Jiménez and others, it is a good motivator for me to do better. Airbrush is an indispensable tool for me and thousands of modelers around the world.

 

S: What are your goals / targets for airbrushing? What do you want to achieve?

ID: My goal is to become the best in airbrushing and I hope to achieve it.  I do what I like and the airbrush is my best friend and helper.

 

S: Do you specialize or prefer to work on a specific surface?

ID: I mostly work with military equipment, especially tanks from the second world war.

 

S: How would you describe your style(s) in airbrushing?

ID: I prefer the art style. The game of color and shadow, it is more picturesque compared to realistic style.

 

S: Any advice to beginners looking to start airbrushing?

ID: My advice – do not be afraid of this amazing tool. Having mastered it, you can get the best results and great pleasure from the process. The more time you spend, the more professional you will get.

 

S: Do you have a website or blog? How can people reach you on social media?

ID: https://www.facebook.com/artarmorstudio

 

 

 

Interview with Emanuele Diletti – 2018 International Airbrush Competition

Our next interview is with the winner of the Fine Arts (Fantasy) category, Emanuele Diletti, from Italy. He talks about his passion for art and ultimately how airbrush became the perfect fit as the conduit for his creativity! You can see more of his work from the links at the end of the interview:

ST3_3800 copiaSparmax (S): Can you tell us a little bit about yourself, what is your background? When did you start airbrushing and what was the learning process was like for you?

Emanuele Diletti (ED): Hi, my name is Emanuele Diletti, I am 27 years old and I live in Rome. I started airbrushing when I was 20. At the beginning, I learned airbrushing as autodidact, then I attended some courses near Rome, specifically the Marissa Osterlee’s one who taught us how to make a portrait, and a custom painting one.  I have always enjoyed painting and since I was a child I drew a lot, most of all animated cartoons such as Mickey mouse or Donald Duck. Even though I love art, I did not attend an artistic school, one of the thing I regret. I bought my first airbrush, an Iwata Revolution, because I liked the effect of the airbrush more than any brush.

 

S: Can you tell us a bit more about your winning entry piece? How / why did you choose it? How long did it take, and what inspired you?

ED: I have chosen “real in wood” because I wanted to link two subjects I like a lot. Usually when I start a painting, I try to think about subjects I like and this time I imagined an elephant and an oak, two natural elements which shares a lot in common, like size and longevity. It took me about 4 months, working on it about 10 hours a week during my free time.

 

S: What does airbrushing mean to you and what drives your passion for airbrushing and creating art? Also, how do you find the ideas for your other works?

ED: I consider airbrushing the form of art which fits the best for me, and I can make shades better than brush for example. I can make better works with airbrush than any tool, and I am more satisfied with the final result, colors and expression, I can make more details and playing with colors. I like the sound too! I catch everything around me and I try to invent, and link the ideas I get, finding a way to paint them. If I see something attractive I want to paint it immediately.

 

S: What are your goals / targets for airbrushing? What do you want to achieve?

ED: My goal is working as an airbrush artist, not just an activity during my free time. It is a passion and I want to live for it. I imagine my future with my airbrush in my hand.

 

S: Do you specialize or prefer to work on a specific surface?

ED: I prefer painting on paper and canvas because I can make effect of light better than other surfaces. Since I attended my first course I got into realism, painting portraits of famous and pretty subjects. But I like surrealism too, in order to free my mind and link subjects that could not have been linked, usually.

 

S: Any advice to beginners looking to start airbrushing?

ED: For the ones who want to start, I would say not to discourage, at the beginning it could be difficult, but the it is only habit! And results will see soon.

 

S: Do you have a website or blog? How can people reach you on social media? 

ED: Here is my web site: http://www.dilettiemanuele.it. You can see my facebook page diletti aerografie too or on instagram.

 

Interview with Jordon Bourgeault – 2018 International Airbrush Competition

Next up in our interview series, First Place winner of the Automotive Arts category, Jordon Bourgeault, talks about the deep meaning behind his entry, the path that led him to becoming an airbrusher, and the experiences that set him up to being an ‘everything guy’ when it comes to airbrushing! Be sure to check out more of Jordon’s amazing works in the links at the end of the interview!

Sparmax (S): Can you tell us a little bit about yourself, what is your background? When did you start airbrushing and what was the learning process was like for you?

Jordon Bourgeault (JB): I would draw a little bit as a child but then stopped during high school getting into drumming and skateboarding. One of my first real jobs was automotive / industrial painting, where my coworkers suggested since I had a bit of an art background I should get an airbrush. I did and I watched some videos and bought a book, but mostly I would just learn from trial and error. I painted a few things for myself, family and friends and eventually got a job at a large prop making company in the paint shop. We would make and paint large scale props and art pieces like dinosaurs for museums, parade floats, movie sets etc. I did that job for a year and was still doing jobs on the side till eventually I had enough jobs piling up that I started doing it full time. That was about 8 years ago and have been working as an airbrusher out of my garage ever since.

 

S: Can you tell us a bit more about your winning entry piece? How / why did you choose it? How long did it take, and what inspired you?

JB: This piece is entitled Blue Eyed Angel and it is a memorial piece for a woman who lost her 3 year old daughter to a car accident. This was a very heavy theme and I did not take it lightly and struggled throughout trying to make every part of it as good as I possibly could. I worked completely organically on this job, and by that I mean I did not have a drawn up design or an idea of what the product would look like at the end so I just started with what I knew I wanted and worked from there, letting what happened next and the design process progress naturally as I worked.  The design includes portraits (or memories) of the girl painted in sepia tones bordered in filigree with her favourite types of flowers. A blue sky background with the girl as an angel is the focal point on the front fairing, as well as marble and frost accents that signifying strength and innocence are also featured throughout the design. This was one of the most difficult pieces I’ve done, both in its technicality and it’s concept. This job took me around 300 hours making it one of the most time consuming jobs I’ve done as well as one I’m most proud of, all these reasons combined are why I chose to enter this particular piece as my only entry in this competition.

 

S: What does airbrushing mean to you and what drives your passion for airbrushing and creating art? Also, how do you find the ideas for your other works?

JB: Airbrushing is one of many passions and hobbies of mine, and I am grateful that I get to have my passion become my job. I think what inspires me the most is my customer, I generally only do commission work and I really try and get myself into the head of my client, after all it is their piece and they are the person you are creating this for. This is what allows me to be the most creative, the customer brings me an idea, and I get to go from there, a lot of the great concepts I’ve been able to work on were not originally my idea, but I got to take them and shape them into something more and put my twist on it. That as well as the technical side of always trying to learn and try new techniques is what keeps pushing me.

 

S: What are your goals / targets for airbrushing? What do you want to achieve?

JB: I just want to keep growing and learning, I feel like if I keep getting better and keep challenging myself I will constantly feel rewarded and stay interested in the craft. I feel like the achievements and recognition come from time to time but those are secondary, or the result of the hard work, but not the aim of it. I just wanna keep getting better and expand my skill set, any success will come naturally as I progress.

 

S: Do you specialize or prefer to work on a specific surface?

JB: I’ve sort of set myself up as an ‘everything guy’ in that I’ve painted large murals, shoes, helmets, masks, cars, bikes, even body paint… I’m kind of willing to tackle any challenge. However lately I’m wanting to put my focus on detail. In the near future I am aiming to try and make every piece high detailed and as crazy as can be.. The simple jobs that don’t challenge me are becoming of less interest and want to set myself up in the niche of extremely high detail. Whether it be body paint, a car, a goalie mask… The medium can be anything, as long as the art and the challenge interest me.

 

S: How would you describe your style(s) in airbrushing?

JB: Well definitely a detail guy, I like realism as well and portrait work, however I don’t think I’m confined to any of those things. Again I would probably put myself as an everything guy, especially because I’m working on commissions, rather than pieces for myself.

 

S: Any advice to beginners looking to start airbrushing?

JB: My advice is just to simply learn as much as you can and grow always, even if you think the price you quoted is too low, or you’re losing your shirt because you are spending to much time.. It’s temporary, if the work is good, the reward will come in time. I truly believe that.

 

S: Do you have a website or blog? How can people reach you on social media?

instagram: @jboairbrush https://www.instagram.com/jboairbrush/?hl=en

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jboairbrush/

Web: www.jboairbrush.com

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCx2vasPBBfUsVB9HG-9DbHg

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jboairbrush

 

 

Interview with Keith Goodson – 2018 International Airbrush Competition

In the first of an ongoing interview series with the winners and top ranked artists in the 2018 Sparmax International Airbrush Competition, we asked the First Place winner of the Fine Art (Realism) category, Keith Goodson, about his journey and artwork, in what is a very enlightening discussion!

We also met with Keith at the Orlando Airbrush Getaway event, organised by Airbrush Action Magazine, in May 2018. (Photo from the event below)

To see more of Keith’s stunning works, visit his website, Instagram, and Facebook page!

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Sparmax (S): Can you tell us a little bit about yourself, what is your background? When did you start airbrushing and what was the learning process was like for you?

Keith Goodson (KG): My name is Keith Goodson and I live in central Florida, United States. I have been working as a professional artist for over 25 years. Over these years I have worked in probably all the various mediums and techniques from airbrushing to traditional painting styles.

I started out in my late teens working with an airbrush and it found it to be a really amazing tool to use for my art. It seemed to come easy for me to be able to understand the fundamentals of how an airbrush works and how to make it work for me in creating works of art. I have always loved Fine Art especially realism. I remember as a passionate young artist I would buy books on modern artist that painted realism; I was so inspired by their talents and techniques.

 

S: Can you tell us a bit more about your winning entry piece? How / why did you choose it? How long did it take, and what inspired you?

KG: I have always loved painting realistic subject matter. I realized that a big part of creating your own body of work is to select a good subject matter. I started painting modern day Items that had related to things people would drink socially, mainly coffee, tea, and wine. So, I remember seeing a beautiful had crafted silver tea set at a friends house. I know that I just had to paint the subject. It was after that that I loved painting highly reflective items. The process for painting “Silver Tray” was very much a learning experience. All together the painting took 2 weeks to paint probably 8-10 hours a day.

 

S: What does airbrushing mean to you and what drives your passion for airbrushing and creating art? Also, how do you find the ideas for your other works?

KG: When I started airbrushing at a young age…I realized that it was not quite accepted as a technique for fine art. It didn’t really bother me I just realized that airbrushing is just another way to apply paint and to express yourself the way that makes you happy. I have always felt like a renaissance man when it comes to my art and I loved trying new things.

Being a self-employed full-time artist you have to steer clear of the preverbal “starving artist” mentality. So, sometimes you have paint what the client wants you to paint.

As far as my personal work and how I get me ideas I have learned to just be patient and wait for the ideas to come. I would do things that “pampered” my soul. Things like… go to a museum, see a movie, or anything that would inspire me.

 

S: What are your goals / targets for airbrushing? What do you want to achieve?

KG: At this stage in my life I would love to be able to teach what I have learned over the years to other young artist.  I feel it’s my responsibility as an accomplished artist to pass down ideas and techniques to others.

I continue to work with the airbrush to not only do fine art, but murals and illustrations as well. I love to be able to use different kinds of paints as well such as gouache and watercolor. I am working on creating a new body of work to be able to show in museums and galleries.

 

S: Do you specialize or prefer to work on a specific surface?

KG: The type of surface I work on depends on the type of subject and what the project needs. Most of the time I prefer to paint on stretched canvas. I find that if you prime (gesso) your canvas several times and then wet-sand to get a smooth surface. In the past I have painted on hot-press illustration board, mostly for doing illustration work. Doing mural painting can be a challenge for airbrushing because of all the different surfaces. My preference is of course a smooth surface.

 

S: How would you describe your style(s) in airbrushing?

KG: I have learned to develop a style that I feel comfortable with and can just focus on creating instead of technique. I usually start with a detailed drawing of what I am going to paint. I then start to use my reference or still-life reference to begin mixing my colors of what I am going to spray. I then begin spraying those colors very freely on the canvas as if it were a blurry image. I then begin to tighten up my image as much as I can with the airbrush. I then begin a process of painting with a brush into the spray. I will fade back and forth this way with the airbrush as well.

 

S: Any advice to beginners looking to start airbrushing?

KG: Airbrushing is a tool to create; it is a way to express yourself. This is not to say that learning about how to use the airbrush techniques is easy. It takes time to develop as an airbrush artist. My advice is to just be patient and just develop the skill and enjoy the process.

 

S: Do you have a website or blog? How can people reach you on social media?

KG: My website :    http://www.keithgoodson.com

Instagram:         https://www.instagram.com/kmgoodson/

Facebook:         https://www.facebook.com/KeithGoodsonArtist/

40th Year of Sparmax

This is the 40th year of the Sparmax brand as you may have heard! As part of this special celebration, we are running the second International Airbrush Competition (which has already started to accept submissions!),  with many (many) prizes thanks to our amazing sponsors and supporters. Categories include Fine Arts, Automotive Arts, and of course, Hobby / Model!

As part of this, modelling website DN Models has also very kindly written about his experiences with Sparmax products on their blog, which you can see here. You can also check out his reviews and instructional videos from his Youtube channel, linked from the website.

Thank you to everyone for making this 40th year possible!

Airbrush Lessons in California

Interested in taking up airbrush or refining your skills? Sparmax-sponsored artist, Daniel Barriga (who was also our featured artist at SEMA 2016), has various classes available. You can check out details on his website: http://www.barrigasfinearts.com/airbrush-lessons/

Here are some photos of previous classes

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